Archive for August, 2013

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21st Sunday in Ordinary Time

August 25, 2013

AN ANSWER WE CANNOT KNOW

Last week, we heard that Jesus has come to bring division and fire to the Earth.  A hard message to be sure, but it is bad news?

If you recall, I said that it is only bad news if we try to remain where we are.  In order for us “not to be burned”, we must move, change, grow from where we are today.

In today’s readings we hear this beautiful passage about how the Lord will gather the nations to Jerusalem.  No one is exempt, but there are some who will play a special role.  Those who are called to a special role are instructed by our second reading to be people of discipline.  If we are to know the Lord, it will not be easy, but requires a great deal of training.  And in the Gospel, Jesus is asked a question:  Will only a few be saved?

In each case, we are all challenged to strive for something more, but also warned that it will not be easy.

CLICK HERE  for the readings for the 21st Sunday in Ordinary Time: (Isaiah 66:18-21; Psalm 117; Hebrews 12:5-7, 11-13; Luke 13:22-30)

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20th Sunday in Ordinary Time

August 18, 2013

THE NECESSARY DIVISION WE MUST UNDERGO

We hear in our second reading today that Jesus endured the cross for the sake of the joy that laid before him.  Indeed, many of us endure trials and difficulties before reaping the rewards.

This Sunday, we consider the difficulties that arise once we align our lives to God – not because God wants it to be difficult, but often because we are often so far from where we would like to be.

Jesus uses very harsh language in our Gospel – he has come to set fire on the earth.  Not exactly the message you expect to hear from the Prince of Peace, but when properly understood, we find there is no contradiction between the compassion of God’s love and judgment of God’s fire.

CLICK HERE  for the readings for the 20th Sunday in Ordinary Time: (Jeremiah 38:4-6, 8-10; Psalm 40; Hebrews 12:1-4; Luke 12:49-53)

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Nineteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

August 11, 2013

FAITH AS EVIDENCE

Over the past two weeks, our readings have asked us a common question:  what purpose does it serve?  Two weeks ago, we considered the purpose of prayer.  (We said the purpose, was not to change God’s mind, but rather, our own.)  Last week, we considered the purpose of our human labours and activities (for we recognize that all is vanity and everything is passing.  Only that which serves God and God’s people will endure)

This week, we consider the purpose of faith itself.  In our first reading, we recall the faith our fore fathers and mothers put in God during the Passover – the courage they had, at times by necessity, in secret – keeping the law.

In our Gospel, we are told to always be ready, for God will come when we least expect.  But the heart of our lesson on faith is found in the second reading as it depicts a bit of salvation history.

CLICK HERE  for the readings for the Nineteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time: (Wisdom 18:6-9; Psalm 33; Hebrews 11:1-2, 8-19; Luke 12:35-40)

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Eighteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

August 4, 2013

WHAT PURPOSE DOES IT SERVE?

Today’s readings ask us to consider what is really important. All things are Vanity, says Qoheleth. In Hebrew, it reads that all things are as a breath – passing, fleeting, temporary.

What is the point of human labour? What purpose does it serve? Does it bring, as Qoheleth says, anxiety of heart? Do we loose sleep because our mind is racing about the things – most of which are probably out of our control?

What treasure are we storing? That is the question in our Gospel today.

While it is not bad to have things in our life, we are challenged to ask what purpose they serve?

CLICK HERE  for the readings for the Eighteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time: (Ecclesiastes 1:2, 2:21-23; Psalm 90; Collisions 3:1-5, 9-11; Luke 12:13-21)